Coffee Facts

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 3)

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 3)

Part 3: Direct Solvent Process

The biggest challenge in decaffeinating coffee is removing the caffeine without a loss in resulting flavor. It’s very easy to accidentally take out the oils, sugars, and proteins found in a coffee bean along with the caffeine, if one is only using water. The solvents target the caffeine, while leaving behind the flavor molecules which lead to a bold and distinct decaffeinated cup of coffee.

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 2)

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 2)

Part 2: Indirect Solvent Process

Some decaffeinating processes use a “decaffeinating agent” or “solvent” such as ethyl acetate, or methylene chloride at one stage in the decaffeinating process. (Don’t worry-- these agents are completely removed  from the green coffee beans, and in some cases, they never even touch the beans themselves...

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 1)

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 1)

Part 1: Water Process

There are no coffee beans that grow caffeine-free, so decaffeinating coffee is something that must be done manually after the coffee is harvested (but before the coffee is roasted).