Coffee Facts

MOFGA Certified Organic Coffee

MOFGA Certified Organic Coffee

The organic coffees we offer are grown on farms that are certified organic, meaning they do not use chemical pesticides or chemical fertilizers. This helps to ensure the health of the soil, the surrounding forest, and the farmers themselves.
Rainforest Alliance Certified Coffee- What it Means

Rainforest Alliance Certified Coffee- What it Means

In order to be Rainforest Alliance Certified, the coffee must have been produced using sustainable methods and the coffee producers have to show a commitment to continuous improvement.
Low Acid Coffee

Low Acid Coffee

What most coffee drinkers mean when they talk about coffee acidity is what we call “coffee belly.” Many coffee drinkers are looking for the best low acid coffee that won’t upset their stomach.
No Coffee Shortages at Carrabassett Coffee

No Coffee Shortages at Carrabassett Coffee

You may have read some scary headlines about the coffee growing industry lately but we are still getting top quality coffee to roast here in Kingfield.
Arabica Vs Robusta

Arabica Vs Robusta

In the coffee drinker’s world, there’s a lot of talk about Arabica and Robusta. But what’s the difference? And why does it matter? Read on.
The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 3)

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 3)

Part 3: Direct Solvent Process

The biggest challenge in decaffeinating coffee is removing the caffeine without a loss in resulting flavor. It’s very easy to accidentally take out the oils, sugars, and proteins found in a coffee bean along with the caffeine, if one is only using water. The solvents target the caffeine, while leaving behind the flavor molecules which lead to a bold and distinct decaffeinated cup of coffee.

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 2)

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 2)

Part 2: Indirect Solvent Process

Some decaffeinating processes use a “decaffeinating agent” or “solvent” such as ethyl acetate, or methylene chloride at one stage in the decaffeinating process. (Don’t worry-- these agents are completely removed  from the green coffee beans, and in some cases, they never even touch the beans themselves...

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 1)

The Green Bag Story: Decaf Coffee (part 1)

Part 1: Water Process

There are no coffee beans that grow caffeine-free, so decaffeinating coffee is something that must be done manually after the coffee is harvested (but before the coffee is roasted).

Coffee Processing: Honey Process

Coffee Processing: Honey Process

Some say that a honey-process coffee tastes like caramel, or ( you guessed it… honey). The flavors of a honey-process coffee include the sweetness of a natural process coffee, but also the brightness of a washed coffee.
Coffee Processing: Wet-Hull (Giling Basah)

Coffee Processing: Wet-Hull (Giling Basah)

Coffee from Indonesia and the South Seas Region is almost always processed using the Wet Hull methods, or giling basah. Giling basah provides the resulting coffee beans with a unique herbal and earthy flavor unlike anything else.

 

Coffee Processing: Natural (Dry-Process)

Coffee Processing: Natural (Dry-Process)

The Natural process is used typically in regions where water is scarce. This dry process leads to coffee with “fruitier” flavors.  Some natural processed coffees are described as having hints of strawberry, blueberry or even blackberry tones. This process adds a hint of sweetness and intrigue to your coffee.
Coffee Processing: Washed (Wet-Process)

Coffee Processing: Washed (Wet-Process)

Washed coffees taste clean and vibrant. The most common method of processing coffee, the washed process provides the most opportunity for consistency and control. If you are looking for a pure coffee taste without added flavor notes from external “impurities”, the best coffee to drink is a wet-processed coffee.